Pervasive Systems and Ubiquitous Computing


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Pervasive computing has been driven over the years by technology miniaturization and the emergence of new context-aware assistive systems. In the near future, making these devices will require far less engineering effort. Lower printing costs, greater diversification of fabrication technologies, and the trend toward fully digital modeling are enabling makers to design systems with specific sensor, actuator, or interaction features. No longer is it necessary to create more than one system with the same design or feature set; instead, personalized functionality in hardware and software is possible.

This special issue intends to provide a comprehensive view of novel system design, manufacturing, and personal fabrication tools and techniques that directly advance pervasive computing technology. The guest editors invite original, high-quality submissions addressing all aspects of fabrication and making, including:. All articles must include thorough validation of the approaches used. Review or summary articles—for example, critical evaluations of the state of the art, or an insightful analysis of established and upcoming technologies—are also welcome if they demonstrate academic rigor and relevance.

For more information, contact the guest editors at pvc computer. Articles submitted to IEEE Pervasive Computing should not exceed 6, words, including all text, the abstract, keywords, bibliography, biographies, and table text. The word count should include words for each table and figure.

References should be limited to at most 15 citations 30 for survey papers. Note that the magazine always welcomes submissions into its regular queue that cover the role of computing in the physical world—as characterized by visions such as the IoT and ubiquitous computing. Topics of interest include hardware design, sensor networks, mobile systems, human—computer interaction, industrial design, machine learning, data science, and societal issues such as privacy and ethics.

Lecture - 37 Pervasive & Ubiquitous Computing

The guest editors invite original, high-quality submissions addressing all aspects of fabrication and making, including: 3D printed devices with applications in pervasive computing Novel personal fabrication methods Personalized medical devices Methods for printing body-conformal sensors and systems Interaction with printed devices Printed implantable computing systems DIY biomedical and pervasive computing design methodology Printed electronics for pervasive computing Methods for sustainability Methods for dealing with intellectual property All articles must include thorough validation of the approaches used.

Submission Information Articles submitted to IEEE Pervasive Computing should not exceed 6, words, including all text, the abstract, keywords, bibliography, biographies, and table text. Fabricating Pervasive Computing Systems. Join Us. Sign In. Conference Calendar.

Pervasive and Mobile Computing

Calls for Papers. Conference Proceedings. This work explores and integrates wearable bio sensors, life-logging technologies and virtual reality. Ubicomp for sustainability, systems support for ubiquitous computing, the Internet of Things. Interested in applying ubicomp sensing to conduct real-world empirical experiments to uncover how everyday practices contribute to carbon externality and global warming, and how we might transform these using technological ubicomp interventions.

Recent work has explored energy in the home, time-shifting energy demand, adaptive thermal comfort, sustainable food choice, and promoting sustainable last-mile freight services. His work is in the area of pervasive computing including systems support for new forms of data capture and interaction and is characterized by an experimental approach involving large-scale deployments of novel systems with end-users. Originally trained as a sociologist but now a computer scientist, I am concerned with how new technologies shape us and how we, in turn, shape our technologies - in the space that is often known as Human-Computer Interaction or HCI.

Human aspects of Computing such as personal and social implications of our digital economy on community values and integrity, well-being, and environmental implications regarding sustainability in digital innovations. Values and frames — applied to digital technologies; and specifically the integration of values into design through the HCI field of Value Sensitive Design.

Interactions occurring in software systems feature-oriented development , aspect-oriented software development and formal verification techniques. I am particularly interested in the deployment and longitudinal study of technology prototypes and probes in complex or semi-wild settings in order to gain insights into issues of user adoption and appropriation.

I follow an iterative development approach with strong elements of co-design and the use of both quantitative and qualitative methods. Notable past examples of deployments which involved longitudinal study over several years include the Hermes office door display system and the Wray display deployment. A current research focus is to explore the potential positive role that digital technologies can play in mediating and facilitating the nature experience.

Mark's research covers various different aspects of the empirical study of work, organisation, human factors and interactive computer systems design. This work is strongly interdisciplinary in nature and has led to extensive and continuing collaborations with colleagues in Sociology, Computing, Informatics and Management departments both in the UK and abroad. His empirical studies of work and technology have contributed to critical debates concerning the relationship between social and technical aspects of IT systems design and use.

He is particularly associated with the development of ethnography as a method for informing design and evaluation. In brief, my research is concerned with everyday practices and technologies, and how they can be related to sustainability.

Pervasive - Workshops

Quality of Service 31 Minimize average processing time The system should process tasks very quickly and on time. These alerts should be in multiple forms according. For example, alert could appear on a screen, give high sound. Safety 36 Avoid conflicting side effects the system must take proper actions that do not cause side effects on people or devices which may reflect wrongly on other devices and generate a chain of side effects as well Safety 37 Avoid invalid operational directives the system must provide safety limits for critical operations in order not to cause damage based on wrong user input Safety 38 Ensure that generated rules do not conflict with system policy the system may generate new rules driven from its knowledge base.

How long will it be until we experience true pervasive computing?

Rules are enforced as well over any activity made by users. Security 47 Maintain data integrity the system must ensure corruption-free and alternation- free data. Security 4. Security 50 Take counter-measures to mitigate security threats the system must take counter-measures to ensure that risks generated from security threats do not cause any harm for system users Security 51 Announce malfunctioning smart objects The system must publish information about smart object s that do not function or miss-behave in the system. In other words, some objects may harm the environment, and the community must be aware of such objects in order to put them in the black list Security 52 Distribute computing power if possible and if budget allows, then it is highly recommended to distribute computing capabilities in the environment where a pervasive system operates.

Smart phones are now considered a small computer with multiple capabilities. Concurrency 59 The published service should be accessed via an authorization certificate The published services may be used by service requesters under some authorization conditions. Accordingly, there could be two major types of the certification 1 public: where the service is accessed by anyone 2 protected: where the access is granted to some people by issuing a service provider certificate. Openness 5.

stufunolacan.tk Documentation may have a machine-readable format version as well e. A system that does not publish any service is a private system.

Account Options

Openness 62 The system should report about the performance of its objects to interested communities The system should report to other interested communities about the performance of the devices. For example, the system may report about the response time of a smart object in a context that has requests, requests, or requests. Openness 63 The system must be scalable within the boundary of the available resources Any system has a limited number of resources.

These resources set boundaries for the number of users that they can serve.

Two-Day Workshops

Scalability 64 The system should add extra resources transparently The system should attach new resources to its structure transparently with minimal interruption for the system functions. These resources should start operating once detected by the system. Scalability 65 The system should be able to forecast the required resources The system should build statistics that show the trend of demand for its resources.

These statistics give indication for the system or the system administrator about its real demand for resources according to different contexts. It shows also an accurate number of needed resources based on the increased requests from the users. Service Discovery 67 The service must declare its contract interface The service must declare its contract including its parameters, expected output, and the communication protocol. The service declaration should have enough description for its contract.

Service Discovery 68 The system must register new services As new objects join the system, they may offer new services. The system should be able to register the new services and make them available for public, protect, or private access accordingly to the system and the service privacy policy. Service Discovery 69 The smart object should bind to the system quickly The smart object requesting a service from a system must bind to the system very quickly.

SIP 6. This is called a handover process, which should be smooth and quick. The system must release the resources of the first service and allocate other resources for the handed over service.

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